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What causes the headache behind the eyes Cervicogenic Headache- Neck pain


What causes the headache behind the eyes

Chronic secondary headaches with cervical spine origins are known as cervicogenic headaches (CGH). Myofascial trigger point pain, which is brought on by overactive anterior neck muscles like the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and weak deep neck flexors, is quite common in CGH patients. Myofascial trigger point pain, which is brought on by overactive anterior neck muscles like the sternocleidomastoid and weak deep neck flexors, is quite common in CGH patients. Hence, when evaluating and managing CGH, the anterior (anterolateral) neck should be taken into account.


There is a huge disease burden associated with headaches for both the individual and the larger population. Headaches are very common. In the World Burden of Disease Survey, headache problems are classified as the third most debilitating condition for people under 50.

In high-income nations, the prevalence of active headache disorder is 52.0% worldwide. Between 1.7 and 4% of adults worldwide claim to experience headaches 15 or more days per month. Although there are regional differences, headaches can afflict people of different ages, ethnicities, socioeconomic statuses, and locations. In North America, where 85 to 90 percent of people say they have occasionally suffered a headache, the prevalence of headaches is the highest.

What causes the headache behind the eyes

Among neurological disorders, tension-type headaches (TTH) are the most prevalent. It is characterised by mild to severe bilateral headaches that occur frequently and do not improve with regular exercise. Between 30 to 78% of the general population experience lifetime prevalence.

Although the exact aetiology of TTH is unknown, it is thought that episodic TTH is caused by peripheral pain processes, but chronic TTH is thought to be caused by central pain mechanisms.


The burden of migraine is both personal and socioeconomically widespread.

Chronic secondary headaches with cervical spine origins are known as cervicogenic headaches (CGH). Between 2.5% to 4.1% of the overall population are impacted. Yet, 15 to 20 per cent of those who experience headaches fall into this category. There is evidence to show that it affects the quality of life in a manner similar to episodic tension-type headaches and migraine.

High prevalence and severe disability are caused by headache disorders.


There is numerous kind of headaches. Some people may respond to physical treatment, especially those who are referred from the cervical spine.

Despite the presence of classification systems, identifying and treating headaches can be challenging.

Prior to therapy, red flag conditions must be taken into account and ruled out.

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